MAKING BAADER DEBONING HISTORY

It all started in Germany
The BAADER Breast Deboner 656 is living proof of how the poultry market and the company are in constant development. In the 1980’s BAADER (Germany) evolved their business and entered the poultry industry by developing a fully automatic breast cap deboning machine, the BA640.

In order to keep up with the constant market development, the breast cap machine was followed by a front half deboning machine, the BA642. In the 1990’s, the focus was the booming North American market and the need for automation, however BAADER soon discovered that there was also a demand for automatic front half deboning worldwide.

Increasing processing speed
BAADER began the new millennium with the launch of the first computerised filleting machine in the poultry industry – the BA655. Each front half was measured and tools were adjusted automatically. No other poultry equipment supplier used such sophisticated filleting equipment at that time.

BAADER used their knowledge and well-proven programs from the fish filleting industry to develop this new, high-speed filleting machine able to process 50 saddles per minute. The BA655 was continuously improved to meet increasing demands on hygiene and maintenance and a new, tough industrial computer was built into the machine.

New centre of poultry processing
The BAADER Group and LINCO Food Systems A/S joined forces in a friendly merger in 2007 to further strengthen BAADER’s position in the global poultry business. That same year, the first Breast Deboner 656 was sold to Gold ‘n Plump in the USA. This machine is still working today.

Over the years, the Breast Deboner 656 has been upgraded several times to fit different markets worldwide. For instance, the first Breast Deboner 656 ran 65 saddles per minute while the newest update runs up to 100 saddles per minute. Furthermore, yagen harvesting, supreme wing cut, wishbone harvesting and back meat harvesting, has been added to the machine features.

BAADER LINCO Poultry Newsletter, January 2018

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